Writing

Need a bit of a nudge with that food story or book idea? Sign up for a class or join the monthly writing group.

Is it time to finish that story?

Next up:

Short story writing

North Sydney Community Centre


Food writing can mean many things. Take the apple as the subject and you can shoot off in many directions, from a flavour profile of heirloom fruit to a how-to on the making of Julia Child’s apple charlotte. Whether you want to write a kitchen memoir, compile your grandmother’s recipes into a book or explore the history of the crème caramel, you’ll benefit from spending time with other aspiring writers and a tutor who can help guide your way. 


What they’re saying:


Thank you. Just the oomph I needed to reinvest in my project. Sometimes it’s the simplest things that have the deepest impact. —Michelle G


Excellent workshop – relevant, challenging and valuable techniques I know I’ll use. —Therese P


Barbara was an engaging, empathetic and insightful teacher. Her shared experiences and advice were invaluable. —Pattie M


Short story writing

Time Saturday, 10am to 4pm

Date July 1, 2018

Venue North Sydney Community Centre





Short stories are action under the fluro spotlight, moments caught and ideas distilled. They capture spirit and rely on razor-sharp observations and tightly knitted details to quickly establish the scene and introduce characters. The short story writer is an editor at heart, someone who knows how to cut away the dead wood to reveal the shimmering core of the story. Limber up with exercises designed to wring the juice out of a story idea and enjoy time to think and write under the guidance of tutor Barbara Sweeney.



Suitable for anyone wanting to write fiction or short-form material that works online in this attention-deficit age, writers who want to reconnect

with work in progress or limber up as they prepare to start a project.




Can’t quite believe that photographer Luisa Brimble talked her creative partner chef Sarah Glover into changing her Italian travel plans in order to speak at Food & Words, but we’re very glad she did. This dynamic duo ran a successful Kickstarter campaign to self-publish their cookbook Wild Adventure, which we’ll get to see ahead of its launch.


Lisa Goldberg, Merelyn Chalmers and Natalya Eskin, three members of the Monday Morning Cooking Club, will tell us about their unique collaborative cooking project that’s all about sisterhood, heirloom recipes and community.


There are more speakers to come.



Food & Words 

2017 Program

Mark Best he’s a man of few words, but he’s not short of an opinion and we’re very happy that he will air one or two of them in conversation, as well as talk about his work with on the Genting and World Dreams cruise ships (overseeing 2000 chefs), his books Marque; A Culinary Adventure and Best Kitchen Basics and his photography.


If you’ve read any of Sam Vincent’s features in The Monthly, you’ll know this guy can tell a compelling story. As a farmer-writer, he writes about the land and food production in the practical voice of the farmer, but with a writer’s sensibility.





Mark Best 

Maverick and mentor, chef Mark Best has always run his own race. His Sydney restaurant Marque was fetted reflecting on the closure of his restaurant Marque, Mark said he enjoys his version of what Australian food is, and I don’t like to be defined by anyone or pushed into corners. I like to do my ownthing. It’s a hard thing to measure until you can look back on your body ofwork, but when I look back now on a body of unique dishes, I’m proud of them.They’re mine. They hold up.

Mark Best 

Maverick and mentor, chef Mark Best has always run his own race. His Sydney restaurant Marque was fetted reflecting on the closure of his restaurant Marque, Mark said he enjoys his version of what Australian food is, and I don’t like to be defined by anyone or pushed into corners. I like to do my ownthing. It’s a hard thing to measure until you can look back on your body ofwork, but when I look back now on a body of unique dishes, I’m proud of them.They’re mine. They hold up.

Mark Best 

Maverick and mentor, chef Mark Best has always run his own race. His Sydney restaurant Marque was fetted reflecting on the closure of his restaurant Marque, Mark said he enjoys his version of what Australian food is, and I don’t like to be defined by anyone or pushed into corners. I like to do my ownthing. It’s a hard thing to measure until you can look back on your body ofwork, but when I look back now on a body of unique dishes, I’m proud of them.They’re mine. They hold up.

Mark Best 

Maverick and mentor, chef Mark Best has always run his own race. His Sydney restaurant Marque was fetted reflecting on the closure of his restaurant Marque, Mark said he enjoys his version of what Australian food is, and I don’t like to be defined by anyone or pushed into corners. I like to do my ownthing. It’s a hard thing to measure until you can look back on your body ofwork, but when I look back now on a body of unique dishes, I’m proud of them.They’re mine. They hold up.

Featured Writers

Tom Dickens

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Fusce eu eleifend risus, vitae porta massa. Vivamus vel ultricies arcu. Maecenas hendrerit efficitur ex id luctus. 

Sam Vincent

Sam Vincent's first book, Blood and Guts: Dispatches from the Whale Wars, was longlisted for the 2015 Walkley Book Award, shortlisted for the 2015 Nib Waverley Library Award for Literature and shortlisted for the 2015 ACT Book of the Year Award. He is a regular contributor to the Monthly, and is an apprentice to his father on the family's cattle and fig farm.

Monday Morning Cooking Club

Merelyn Chalmers, Lisa Goldberg and Natalya Eskin (far left, centre and far right), are from the Monday Morning Cooking Club (pictured here with other members Jacqui Israel and Lynn Niselow), a unique collaborative cooking project that’s all about sisterhood, heirloom recipes and community.

Monday Morning Cooking Club
Mark Best 

Maverick and mentor, chef Mark Best has always run his own race. His Sydney restaurant Marque was fetted reflecting on the closure of his restaurant Marque, Mark said he enjoys his version of what Australian food is, and I don’t like to be defined by anyone or pushed into corners. I like to do my ownthing. It’s a hard thing to measure until you can look back on your body ofwork, but when I look back now on a body of unique dishes, I’m proud of them.They’re mine. They hold up.


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